Themes

Space and Place in the Humanities

Theme: Space and Place in the Humanities (begins autumn 2019)

The theme Space and Place in the Humanities addresses questions of how people find meaning in spaces, places, and landscapes, how the organization of spatial dimensions has affected and reflect social relations and identities in past and contemporary societies, and what kind of political, cultural, and social uses it has served. The structure and implementation of the theme is thoroughly multidisciplinary: the students will be acquainted with essential analytical and theoretical concepts from history, archaeology, digital humanities, human geography, art history, architecture, linguistics, and history of religions, which allows for a comprehensive understanding of space and place and comparisons across the disciplines.

The aim of the theme is to give doctoral students knowledge and insight of various aspects associated with spatial theory, as well as to supply them with a set of theoretical and methodological tools that can be applied in research and other specialist work.

The theme runs for two years, beginning in the autumn of 2019 and with one five-credit module being offered per term. The theme will be taught in English.

Space and Place in the Humanities

The Spatial Turn in the Humanities: Theories and Applications, 5 ECTS (Autumn 2019)

The course addresses the so-called ‘spatial turn’ in the humanities and offers PhD candidates theoretical and methodological tools to critically analyse space and its cultural significance from an interdisciplinary perspective and across time periods.

Space and Place in the Humanities

Space, Memory, and the Past, 5 ECTS (Spring 2020)

The course offers a comprehensive overview of questions related to space, memory and the past, and works within an interdisciplinary framework to consider how these three concepts intersect and have been used for purposes ranging from positive creation of communal narratives to violent exclusion of ‘others’.

Space and Place in the Humanities

Spaces and Identities, 5 ECTS (Autumn 2020)

This course examines how social relations and identities are determined by the spatial organisation of social life. During this course doctoral students analyse how different types of spaces constitute and project group and individual identities, and through them allow for and enforce different social structures, social discourses, linguistic borders, as well as a sense of community but also social unrest.

Space and Place in the Humanities

Workshop: Space and Place in the Humanities, 5 ECTS (Spring 2021)

During a one-week workshop on location in Rome, the course participants will practice their skills in analysing the social and cultural roles of urban and rural spaces.

Welcome

Theme: The Dynamics of Multilingualism (begins autumn 2019)

The aim of the theme is to address the need for a multidisciplinary approach to global challenges related to increased mobility and multilingualism. In theory, multilingualism as a societal and individual resource holds the promise of engaging other ways of living and thinking, building convivial relationships and ultimately transforming ourselves and our societies. The aim of this theme is to address the need for a multidisciplinary approach to global challenges related to increased mobility and multilingualism. In theory, multilingualism as a societal and individual resource holds the promise of engaging other ways of living and thinking, building convivial relationships and ultimately transforming ourselves and our societies.

Students will engage critically with a range of theoretical frameworks in order to explore the ways in which contemporary societal challenges are constructed, mediated and lived through language as well as the methodological challenges posed by globalisation and transnational mobility. This theme connects strongly with contemporary thinking in, for example, sociolinguistics, semiotics, literary and media theory, educational studies, philosophy, and sociology.

The theme runs for two years, beginning in the autumn of 2019 and with one five-credit module being offered per term. The theme will be taught in English.

Welcome

The Dynamics of Multilingualism: Encounters, 5 ECTS (Autumn 2019)

This is the first and introductory course within the theme and deals with different theoretical and methodological frameworks in order to investigate the complexities regarding identity, corporeality, language, place, ethnicity and other differences in relation to the new global zones of contact.

Welcome

The Dynamics of Multilingualism: Affinities, 5 ECTS (Spring 2020)

The course addresses the emergence of new global – often temporary – linguistic communities and associated communicative practices, and examines how these communities are formed by and through different languages.

Welcome

The Dynamics of Multilingualism: Dislocations, 5 ECTS (Autumn 2020)

The course introduces the second year of the theme and addresses issues relating to the displacement and separation resulting from increased mobility and its consequences, both in terms of social and linguistic categories such as “semi-lingualism” and different linguistically creative approaches to resistance and diversity.

Welcome

The Dynamics of Multilingualism: Diasporas, 5 ECTS (Spring 2021)

The course covers both traditional and new (e.g. academic) diasporas, the emergence of creoles and World Englishes. Within the course, students will explore different issues through empirical analysis of data related to various language phenomena.

Theme: Environmental Humanities

Based on an understanding of human and nonhuman ecologies in terms of the more-than-human, the theme approaches the humanities from this interdisciplinary perspective to forge reconfigurations and extensions of the field. It is in this respect that the Environmental Humanities come to the fore. This burgeoning field of studies engages creatively with sustainability issues, problematizes the ways in which the human has overstepped his mark and by so doing jeopardized the future of the entire planet. 

The theme runs for two years, started in the autumn of 2018 and offers one five-credit module being per term.

The theme is offered in English.

Fotsteg

Human footprints, 5 ECTS (Spring, 2019)

The course explores and problematizes the role the human plays in the long term changes we are witnessing on our planet today. It also highlights the ways in which the humanities increasingly make use of the concept of the Anthropocene to question and challenge nature-culture dichotomies as well as the presumed exceptionalism of the human.

More-than-human

More-than-human relations, 5 ECTS (Autumn, 2019)

The course engages critically with posthuman theories, asking questions such as: How to understand and engage the spaces and networks that take place between the human and the more-than-human? How do they affect our perception of environmental challenges on a global scale, our reading of history and ethics?

Konst

Imaging, curating, wording, worlding, 5 ECTS (Spring, 2020)

In what ways can research contribute to change through imagining and engaging with the environment and civic society? The course aims to facilitate ethical engagement through the use of different creative and innovative methods in order to develop creative skills and strategies to communicate one’s research.

Världskarta

Theme: World Literature and the Culture of Texts

What is a text? What happens when texts are remediated, edited, relocated or translated? What methods are available for textual study? How can textual theory, translation studies, and theories of world literature illuminate one another? With its dual focus on textuality and cross-cultural comparison, the theme World Literatures and the Culture of Texts aims at providing critical and exploratory responses to these questions. It addresses thereby topics of high relevance to students in most domains of the humanities, including literature, language disciplines, translation, history, historical linguistics, and the history of ideas.

The theme runs for two years, started in the autumn of 2018 and offers one five-credit module being per term.

The theme is offered in English.

Världskarta

World Literatures and the Culture of Texts: Methods, 5 ECTS (Spring 2019)

The course “Methods” deals with issues relating to philology – both as an historical phenomenon and as a current and transcultural method – in addition to archival research methods, textual criticism, and current methods of literary interpretation.

Världskarta

World Literatures and the Culture of Texts: Translation, 5 ECTS (Autumn 2019)

The course ”Translation” deals with the literary dimensions of translation, multilingualism and reception. There will be special emphasis on cultural and sociological aspects of translation, and on how these affect the mutability of literary texts across times and places.

Världskarta

World Literatures and the Culture of Texts: Texts in Transit, 5 ECTS (Spring 2020)

The course “Texts in Transit” deals with culture- and language-specific aspects of textual enquiry, as well as “bibliomigrancy”, that is the ways in which books circulate globally, gather in libraries and acquire material presence as versions of “world literature” in discrete public spheres.

Materiality

Workshop: Materiality and the Human, 5.0 ECTS (Spring 2019)

The aims of the course are for the student to identify and explore a context in which materiality is significant for their doctoral research, and to produce a publishable research article on this topic. The course takes the form of a workshop to which a pair of internationally recognised researchers will be invited as mentors and as a sounding board.

Themes — General information

The Faculty’s continuous operations should include four specialisations, here referred to as themes. These themes should be broad enough to benefit doctoral students from a wide range of fields, and narrow enough to enable the participating doctoral students to engage in a substantial academic exchange with each other.